Viewing: Atlas of Living Australia

Mar 19

March 19, 2015

Alan Paskett - Sepia apama, Black Point, 3-4m June 2014

Cuttlefish of South Australia

Before I embarked on the production of the documentary film Cuttlefish Country, I had little appreciation of the diversity of cuttlefish species which are found in South Australian waters. When I discuss cuttlebones with friends or strangers, I’m usually met with surprise at the revelation that cuttlebones found in beachwash along the South Australian coast represent not one, not two but several species of cuttlefish. It is also unfortunate that there is no single resource available whereby South Australian naturalists or beach combers…

Posted in Cephalopods, Marine invertebrates | By

Feb 7

February 7, 2015

Juvenile flounder, Glenelg North - Dan Monceaux 2015

Confounded by flounder in South Australian waters

During a walk through the shallows at Glenelg North beach after 9.30 pm last night, in knee-deep water, Emma and I were delighted to spot a numbers of small (likely juvenile) flounder. The animals were each less than 10 cm in length and sported fine, uniform sandy patterns which allowed them to practically disappear on pale, sandy bottom. When startled by our lights or movement, the animals escaped swiftly, hugging the contours of the sandy ‘dunes’. On settling, they would sometimes shuffle into the…

Posted in Bony fishes, Citizen Science, Species lists | By

Jun 26

June 26, 2014

Seastar

Help the SA Museum digitise its seastar collection records

The South Australian Museum has just loaded its second crowd-sourcing expedition on the Atlas of Living Australia’s Biodiversity Volunteer Portal – and they’re looking for your help! The Biodiversity Volunteer Portal is an opportunity for volunteers at home to help create database records for the South Australian museum’s specimen collection. The museum has more than 1.5 million specimens in their Marine Invertebrates collection. Getting them all digitised and online will make them more accessible for researchers and the general public, but it’s…

Posted in Citizen Science, Seastars | By