Viewing: Marine invertebrates

Jul 9

July 9, 2017

The Branched Feeding Tentacles of Dendrochirotid Sea Cucumbers

I recently posted this photograph on the “ID Please (Marine Creature Identification)” Facebook page, asking “Are these sea cucumber tentacles? Taken at Port Stanvac, South Australia.” I soon received a reply from Frédéric Ducarme saying “Yes, dendrochirotid sea cucumbers.” Frederic provided me with a link to Wikipedia where it read ““Dendrochirotida are an order of sea cucumbers. Members of this order have branched tentacles and are suspension feeders. Examples include Thyonella and Cucumaria.” The Wikipedia page went on to say,…

Posted in Marine invertebrates | By

Jun 26

June 26, 2017

Bolinopsis, Port Bonython 2017 - Dan Monceaux

The comb jellies Bolinopsis and Mnemiopsis

I took this ‘one off’ shot of a clear jelly during my dive at Moonta Bay jetty in June 2017. While the photograph is enigmatic, my observations were sufficient for me to pursue a positive identification of the species. It turned out to be a comb jelly, and my interest in the animal was piqued and extended with help from the author of the books Stung! and Jellyfish: A Natural History, Dr Lisa-Ann Gershwin. I posted the photo on the…

Posted in Cnidaria, Invasive species, Jetties, Marine invertebrates | By

May 22

May 22, 2017

Nudibranch name change

According to the web page found at http://www.urgdiveclub.org.au/scientific-names-do-change/ , “two-part scientific names contain a hierarchy which can change if an organism is re-classified”. I wrote about this topic in my article titled “Changes to Seastar Names” at http://mlssa.org.au/2010/10/07/changes-to-seastar-names/ . It can be difficult for ‘hobbyists’ such as ourselves to keep up with the changes for projects such as our Photo Index. It recently came to my attention, thanks to Society member Jeff Bowey, that the red-netted nudibranch previously known as Chromodoris…

Posted in Marine invertebrates, Molluscs, Nudibranchs | By

Mar 25

March 25, 2017

FURTHER DISCOVERIES AT THE SHIP’S GRAVEYARD

In addition to my recent discovery of an Oyster Blenny at the Ship’s Graveyard in the North Arm of the Port River, I also found this bivalve mollusc shell there: – I checked it out further when I got home. I thought that it was a Venus shell, Tapes literatus. I photographed it with my mobile phone at home and sent the photo to Peter Hunt from the Malacological Society of SA for a positive ID. Peter’s response was as…

Posted in Bony fishes, Invasive species, Marine invertebrates, Molluscs | By

Dec 14

December 14, 2016

Acorn worm’s ‘Wolverine’ style healing powers

According to a recent report in the Sunday Mail (4/12/16), acorn worms can apparently regrow any of their body parts from nothing. The report was written by Harry Pettit from Washington, USA. He says that “researchers hope that unravelling the worm’s DNA could lead the team to human limb regeneration”. The researchers involved are from the University of Washington and they are trying to open full limb regeneration in humans. The acorn worm apparently has a genetic makeup like that…

Posted in Marine invertebrates, Research, Worms | By

Dec 13

December 13, 2016

The Upside-down Jellyfish, Cassiopea ndrosia

The last thing that I expected to be doing on the first days of my recent retirement from work was studying jellyfish, but that’s exactly what happened! That’s just the way that things go sometimes. It all started over the Queen’s Birthday holiday long weekend last June though, as far as I can determine. That was the weekend that I decided to go kayaking alone at Garden Island. I think that I noticed an upside-down jellyfish in the shallow water…

Posted in Cnidaria, Marine invertebrates | By

Nov 27

November 27, 2016

The Predatory Behaviour of an Eleven-armed Star Fish

During our recent dive at Rapid Bay jetties, I recorded a large eleven-armed star fish attacking an abalone. I have to admit that I set the whole thing up though. I was swimming along the side of the new jetty’s piles when I came across this abalone at the base of a jetty pile. It was attached to a small plate-like rock: – On the other side of the jetty pile was this eleven-armed star fish: – I evilly-decided to…

Posted in Marine invertebrates, Molluscs, Seastars | By

Sep 8

September 8, 2016

What Is CIGESMED for Divers?

In November 2013, I hosted Vasilis Gerovasileiou from Greece during his visit to South Australia. We only managed one dive together though. We managed a dive at Rapid Bay jetty on16th November 2013. Vasilis had only brought a 5mm wetsuit with him for his dives in Australia. This suit probably served him well for dives in WA & Queensland, but it didn’t work out so well for his dive in SA. The water temperature at Rapid Bay in November was…

Posted in Citizen Science, Marine invertebrates, Molluscs, Research, sea urchins | By

Jul 19

July 19, 2016

Follow-up re Sea urchin barrens and mini-barrens

Further to my article titled “Sea urchin barrens and mini-barrens” (http://wp.me/p4BvtZ-pZ ), Society member, David Muirhead commented, “Magazine Bay looks so nice Steve. I can see why you dived that day rather than sat on the beach reading a magazine (or waiting for one to explode)!” David then added, “PS: the only barrens or minis I’d seen in my early diving days were in Fiji and those were uncommon, but here in SA it is only in the last few…

Posted in Marine invertebrates, sea urchins | By

Jul 3

July 3, 2016

Victorian marine worm I.D.

Early April 2016, we received an email message with the subject heading “Possible new species”. The message read (in part), “I was just went down Shoreham Beach with my family for a walk through the reef and stumbled across a strange creature. We were able to get a good quality video of it and thought I could send to you. We have previously sighted it three years ago at Mushroom Reef but wasn’t able to get it to any professionals….

Posted in Coastal species, intertidal zone, Marine invertebrates, Worms | By