Viewing: Invasive species

Jun 26

June 26, 2017

The comb jelly Bolinopsis

I took this ‘one off’ shot of a clear jelly during my dive at Moonta Bay jetty in June: – I posted the photo on the Facebook page for “I Friggin’ Love Jellyfish”, with the comment “Saw this clear ‘jelly’ yesterday at Moonta Bay jetty”. Lisa-ann Gershwin soon responded to the post with the comments “Yep, Bolinopsis! Were there a lot around, Steve? This is the same species I’ve been concerned about for years in Spencer Gulf. It occasionally blooms…

Posted in Cnidaria, Invasive species, Marine invertebrates | By

Mar 25

March 25, 2017

FURTHER DISCOVERIES AT THE SHIP’S GRAVEYARD

In addition to my recent discovery of an Oyster Blenny at the Ship’s Graveyard in the North Arm of the Port River, I also found this bivalve mollusc shell there: – I checked it out further when I got home. I thought that it was a Venus shell, Tapes literatus. I photographed it with my mobile phone at home and sent the photo to Peter Hunt from the Malacological Society of SA for a positive ID. Peter’s response was as…

Posted in Bony fishes, Invasive species, Marine invertebrates, Molluscs | By

Mar 23

March 23, 2017

The Oyster Blenny, Omobranchus anolius

When I recently snorkelled at the Ship’s Graveyard in the North Arm of the Port River, I saw lots of blennies disappearing into holes on the river bed. They were much too quick for me to be able to identify them at all. Some of them seemed to have long-flowing eel-like tails. I struck it lucky when I returned back to shore and a blenny posed on a rock for me. I was quite surprised by the colour, shape and…

Posted in Bony fishes, Dive Reports, Invasive species | By

Feb 14

February 14, 2015

European shore crab (Carcinus maenus) at Marino Rocks - Dan Monceaux 2015

Invasive marine species in South Australia

Since first learning about marine biosecurity and the translocation of marine species from one region’s waters to another via commercial shipping and recreational boating, I’ve come to recognise a few of our locally found invasive species. This summer I’ve added another invasive species to the list of alien organisms I’ve found while rock-pooling, beach walking or snorkeling along SA’s coast. The most conspicuous invasive to be found in SA (in my experience) is the European fan worm. Not one to keep a…

Posted in Invasive species, Species lists | By

Nov 30

November 30, 2014

Buried Shovelnosed ray, Glenelg by Dan Monceaux MLSSA

Nocturnal observations around Glenelg marina and jetty

While this weekend’s scorching hot temperatures kept my wife and I out of the sun for the most part, we couldn’t resist making a late night beach walk down at Glenelg. While the habitats there are highly modified due to breakwater and marina construction, dune removal for coastal development plus stormwater, Patawalonga and treated wastewater inflows, there remains an abundance of life to be observed by anyone with an eye for detail and a nice bright flashlight. Emma and I…

Posted in intertidal zone, Invasive species, Jetties, Marine invertebrates, Pollution, Sharks & Rays, Stormwater | By

Jun 16

June 16, 2014

Whyalla Underwater Shootout a resounding success

The inaugural Whyalla Underwater Shootout held over the long weekend from June 7-9th was a resounding success, according to its organisers. The competition, which was hosted by the Marine Life Society of South Australia attracted 96 entries from eleven photographers from around the state. Facing the chilly waters of Upper Spencer Gulf in the winter time, they suited up, snorkelled, dived and clicked away in the shallow waters off Whyalla and Point Lowly. To qualify for the competition, images had to…

Posted in Citizen Science, Events, Invasive species | By

Apr 30

April 30, 1998

European fan worm

Sabellid Worm Discovered at Port Noarlunga

Mary Anne Stacy of the Port Noarlunga Aquatics Centre recently discovered an unusual fan worm on a pylon of the Port Noarlunga Jetty. Suspecting it to be a Sabella worm (a species introduced from European waters in ships’ ballast) Mary Anne organised for it to be identified. Her fears proved to be correct. This is especially disturbing as although this highly competitive worm is particularly abundant in the Port River area, they were not thought to have spread further south…

Posted in Invasive species, Jetties | By

Feb 1

February 1, 1997

European fan worm

The European Featherduster Worm (Sabella spallanzani)

South Australian divers may have heard a little bit about the introduction of exotic species into Australian waters. It is said to be an increasing problem but we do not see much evidence of it in SA waters. Fortunately, we have not yet seen anything of the large Northern Pacific Seastar which is decimating Tasmania’s marine life. There is, however, one introduced species that seems to be rapidly establishing itself in our waters. It is the European Featherduster Worm (which…

Posted in Invasive species | By