Viewing: Coastal species

Aug 23

August 23, 2015

The wonderful and diverse syngnathids of Normanville, South Australia

I am a research associate at the California Academy of Sciences where I study the evolutionary relationships among seahorse, seadragons, and pipefish in the family Syngnathidae. I employ DNA sequencing, morphological characters, and underwater photography to gain a better understanding of these relationships which are largely unresolved in this family, and therefore is in need of a major revision which... Read more

Posted in Bony fishes, Coastal species, Dive Reports, Jetties, Species lists, Syngnathids | By

Oct 15

October 15, 2014

wetland shorebirds - Dan Monceaux

Adelaide International Bird Sanctuary talk with Tony Flaherty, October 16

This month’s Port Environment Forum is on Thursday the 16th at 7pm, at the Port Adelaide Town Hall (entry off Nile St). The topic will be the Adelaide International Bird Sanctuary, with guest speaker Dr Tony Flaherty (Coast and Marine Manager for the Adelaide region. Tony was recently announced as the recipient of the Conservation Council’s 2014 Unsung Hero Award. This should be an... Read more

Posted in Achievements, Coastal species, Shorebirds | By

Jul 12

July 12, 2014

More on the adaptations of plants that can tolerate being close to the sea

As explained in Brian Brock’s 2013 Journal article “Adaptation of some Coastal Species”, Brian has had a life-long interest in coastal plants. He wrote to us several times between May & June 2014 to discuss several aspects of the subject. An early letter from Brian said (in part), “Coleman & Cook have an interesting paper called “Habitat Preferences of the... Read more

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Jul 12

July 12, 2014

Polypores (Bracket fungi) & their conks (woody fruiting bodies)

Following the publication of my 2013 Journal article about lichens on trees, Brian Brock wrote to me, saying “Dear Steve, your lichen-like growth on page 6 of the (2013) Journal (see photo below) may be a thin fruiting bracket (‘conk’?) of a wood decaying fungus. A lichen-like growth on a coastal tree at Semaphore beach (Taken with iPhone by Steve... Read more

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