Posts By: Steve Reynolds

Jun 25

June 25, 2017

Our stay at the Moonta Bay Beach Villas

A small group of Society members were able to stay at the Moonta Bay Beach Villas over the weekend recently, thanks to the kindness of Peter Anastassiadis. We were supposed to be a bigger group, but half of the group cancelled out at the last minute due to cold or flu problems. Lyndon and David arrived at the villa on the Friday night. They were soon joined by Haixia Wen. Lyndon was able to do some stand-up paddle boarding by…

Posted in Dive Reports, Jetties | By

Jun 19

June 19, 2017

Osedax Worms Update 2

Osedax worms have been found in Australian waters for the first time. Osedax worms are ‘whale’ worms, worms that feed on the bones of dead whales. They were recently found burrowed deep inside the bones of a pilot whale hauled up from a deep-sea abyss off Byron Bay, New South Wales (no pun intended). The skull and spine of the pilot whale were both hauled up from the abyss off Australia’s east coast. Scientists discovered Osedax worms burrowed deep inside…

Posted in Research, Whales & Dolphins, Worms | By

Jun 13

June 13, 2017

Congolli, Pseudaphritis urvillii

This fish that I photographed at the Ships’ Graveyard in the North Arm of the Port River earlier this year was confirmed on iNaturalist as being a Congolli (Pseudaphritis urvillii). I had reported the sighting of the Congolli in my article titled “Further Discoveries at the Ships Graveyard” at http://mlssa.org.au/2017/03/25/further-discoveries-at-the-ships-graveyard/ I came across another one in Angas Inlet at the Garden Island jetty during a night dive there on 8th June (World Oceans Day). My photos of it were certainly…

Posted in Bony fishes | By

Jun 12

June 12, 2017

Shovelnose Stingarees

Fish identification can be tricky at the best of times. Then there are often new species that were not included in the old fish books. And the scientific names of species are often changing, and even changing back again. I recently revisited my 2016 article titled “Same Ray Seen Two Months Apart” (It can be found at http://mlssa.org.au/2016/01/09/same-ray-seen-two-months-apart/). It was about my sighting of a ‘stingray’ with part of its tail missing. I had seen what appeared to be the…

Posted in Sharks & Rays | By

May 28

May 28, 2017

Turn the Tide on Plastics in the Ocean

On Sunday 28th May, my wife and I attended a gathering at the Largs Bay jetty kiosk. Artist Andrew Baines was conducting one of his famous photo shoots on the beach by the jetty. The photo shoot was being linked to World Ocean’s Day. It was held in collaboration with United Nations Associated of Australia (SA) & the City of Port Adelaide Enfield. Everybody who wanted to take part in the photo shoot had to dress in black and wear…

Posted in Conservation, Events, Pollution, Submissions to Government | By

May 22

May 22, 2017

Nudibranch name change

According to the web page found at http://www.urgdiveclub.org.au/scientific-names-do-change/ , “two-part scientific names contain a hierarchy which can change if an organism is re-classified”. I wrote about this topic in my article titled “Changes to Seastar Names” at http://mlssa.org.au/2010/10/07/changes-to-seastar-names/ . It can be difficult for ‘hobbyists’ such as ourselves to keep up with the changes for projects such as our Photo Index. It recently came to my attention, thanks to Society member Jeff Bowey, that the red-netted nudibranch previously known as Chromodoris…

Posted in Marine invertebrates, Molluscs, Nudibranchs | By

May 10

May 10, 2017

Normanville Jetty and Hotspot

David Muirhead says that the Normanville jetty is “a pretty poor excuse for a jetty”. “I have, however, found some surprisingly good photographic subjects on the piles at high tide, which is all the more titillating given the entire jetty can be above the water mark,” he says. (The present jetty is the second Normanville jetty. The first one was a short distance to the south of the current one but, after severe storm damage, it was decided that repairing…

Posted in Bony fishes, Dive Reports, Jetties, Maritime History, Syngnathids | By

May 3

May 3, 2017

The Rescue of Australian Prisoners of War following US attack on Japanese ships during WWII

In 1944, hundreds of Australian and British prisoners of war (PoW) held by the Japanese were briefly held at the River Valley Road Camp in Singapore. They were then going to be sent to Japan to work in coalmines there. A convoy of eight vessels with PoW onboard left Singapore on 6th September 1944. The vessels in the convoy comprised of the 10,000-ton Kachidoki Maru (formerly the American ship President Harrison), two oil tankers, two cruisers, a corvette, another small…

Posted in Maritime History | By

Apr 30

April 30, 2017

South Australians onboard the final voyage of the Titanic

I had a bit of a surprise when I visited the cemetery at the Aldinga Uniting Church recently. I had gone there to photograph the Star of Greece memorial there. Star of Greece memorial (Taken by Steve Reynolds) I found a couple of graves in the name of McRae near the memorial. What caught my eye was a headstone for the McRae family with a reference to the Titanic. The headstone for the McRae family (with a reference to the…

Posted in Maritime History | By

Apr 27

April 27, 2017

Shrimps, Seadragons and Siphonognathus argyrophanes

Shrimps, Seadragons and Siphonognathus argyrophanes (As told to Steve by David Muirhead) The fish Tubemouth, Siphonognathus argyrophanes, looks very pipefish-like, and many veteran divers incorrectly think that they are true pipefish. They are, however, in the same family as wrasses (Labridae), which includes the ‘rock cod’ or ‘parrotfish’, plus weed whiting and western blue groper (which strictly should be called a western blue groper wrasse because it’s completely unrelated to tropical groupers like the giant Queensland Grouper). Tubemouth, Siphonognathus argyrophanes…

Posted in Bony fishes, Citizen Science, Crustaceans, Syngnathids | By