Posts By: Steve Reynolds

Oct 31

October 31, 2017

The Occurrence of Cowfish in West Lakes & the Port River

David Muirhead and I were approached by a mother and child prior to our dive at the Trimmer Parade end of West Lakes. The lady asked us if we were aware of a “mid-size, bluish fish that would swim at the surface of the lake, taking in breaths of air every now and again before submerging once more”. She made... Read more

Posted in Bony fishes | By

Oct 16

October 16, 2017

Krefft’s Frillgoby, Bathygobius krefftii

I’ve long yearned to have a fish species, or any species at all, named after me. That doesn’t look like happening in a hurry, but I now feel content that I have at least had some influence, no matter how small, on the name of a fish species. The story behind this ‘naming’ commenced when I photographed this little fish... Read more

Posted in Bony fishes | By

Oct 5

October 5, 2017

An evening with Steve Parish

Tony Isaacson, MLSSA Life Member, attended a (workshop?) evening presented by Steve Parish at the Beerwah Library in Queensland this month. Tony with a promotional poster (Taken by Tony?) Steve is a well-published photographer (more than 2500 published books over 50 Years). His first book, “Australia’s Ocean of Life” was published in 1974 (as Stephen Parish): – A screen shot... Read more

Posted in Achievements, Underwater Photography | By

Sep 13

September 13, 2017

The 1875 Communication Cable from Normanville to Kangaroo Island

In December 1875, a submarine communication cable ran from Normanville to Kingscote on Kangaroo Island. Society member and local resident, David Muirhead sent us the following details and photographs concerning the cable: – The spot where the communication cable to Kangaroo Island ran into the sea at Normanville (Taken by David Muirhead) The jigsaw-shaped bit of wet sand at the... Read more

Posted in intertidal zone, Jetties, Maritime History | By

Sep 3

September 3, 2017

Artefacts from Argosy Lemal at Port River Sailing Club

As I stated in my article titled “Follow-up on the Schooners Lemael & Booya” at http://mlssa.org.au/2016/09/09/follow-up-on-the-schooners-lemael-booya/ , “I had previously written a series of articles regarding a number of sailing ships, but two in particular – the Booya and the Lemael. The series started with “Cyclone Tracy Shipwrecks” in our April 2005 newsletter (No.320). This was followed by “More About... Read more

Posted in Maritime History, Shipwrecks | By

Aug 25

August 25, 2017

Sternum from a Little Penguin found on Largs North beach

A piece of bone that I found whilst walking on Largs North beach this month has been identified as being from a Little Penguin. I took a couple of photos of the bone, which I first thought could have been shark cartilage. I posted some of these photos on Facebook, seeking identification of the creature that the bone may have... Read more

Posted in Citizen Science, Coastal species, Shorebirds | By

Aug 8

August 8, 2017

Jean and “Kitty” Whyte (Daughter of shark attack victim died exactly 77 years to the day later)

“Kitty” Whyte was SA’s first known shark attack victim. In March 1926, she had been giving swimming lessons to some children at Brighton jetty when she was attacked by a 3-4m shark She was subsequently rescued by two men in a boat, but she apparently died on the beach.  I previously documented Kitty’s death in two past MLSSA Newsletter issues... Read more

Posted in Achievements, Sharks & Rays | By

Jul 9

July 9, 2017

The Branched Feeding Tentacles of Dendrochirotid Sea Cucumbers

I recently posted this photograph on the “ID Please (Marine Creature Identification)” Facebook page, asking “Are these sea cucumber tentacles? Taken at Port Stanvac, South Australia.” I soon received a reply from Frédéric Ducarme saying “Yes, dendrochirotid sea cucumbers.” Frederic provided me with a link to Wikipedia where it read ““Dendrochirotida are an order of sea cucumbers. Members of this... Read more

Posted in Marine invertebrates | By

Jul 6

July 6, 2017

Port Noarlunga Anchor’s Anniversary

The ‘big’ anchor at Port Noarlunga reef has been there as long as I have known, but only just. It was apparently placed in position at the reef just under two weeks before I did my first dive there. It was years before I got to see it though. It was Sunday 22nd January 1978 when divers moved the anchor... Read more

Posted in Dive Reports, Maritime History | By

Jul 6

July 6, 2017

We can claim to have reached a 60-year milestone in 2017

As explained in my article titled “MLSSA replaced the SA Museum Underwater Research Group”, “MLSSA, formerly MARIA (SA Branch), followed on from the SA Museum Underwater Research Group. The Museum URG was established in 1957. It was part of many international URGs which commenced in France in 1945. The first URG was established in Toulon, France in 1945 and was... Read more

Posted in Achievements, Events | By