Posts By: Steve Reynolds

Dec 20

December 20, 2019

Seaweeds found to be also sensitive to ocean warming

Seaweeds found to be also sensitive to ocean warming by Steve Reynolds Alexia Graba-Landry says that seaweeds are just as sensitive to ocean warming as corals. Alexia is a 2017-2019 PhD candidate at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University in Queensland. She was a Lizard Island Reef Research Foundation Doctoral Fellow in 2017.... Read more

Posted in Algae, Climate change, Coral, Research | By

Dec 1

December 1, 2019

UN Report Warns About the Threat of Increased Marine Heatwaves

UN REPORT WARNS ABOUT THE THREAT OF INCREASED MARINE HEATWAVES by Steve Reynolds The December issue of the SDFSA’s newsletter reported that scientists were warning that marine heatwaves were threatening the oyster industry and affecting the Great Barrier Reef (Marine Heatwaves Threatening Oyster Industry and Affecting Great Barrier Reef, Scientists Warn). It stated that “Scientists warn that climate change is... Read more

Posted in Climate change, Research | By

Nov 23

November 23, 2019

From Stromatolites to Microbialites

From Stromatolites to Microbialites by Steve Reynolds During Ian Lewis’ talk about cave diving around Mount Gambier at the SDFSA’s Splash Inn event during SA Scuba Week, he mentioned the occurrence of stromatolites in the Blue Lake. This reminded me about the article Report on the Blue Lake Sediment Sampling & Research Programme February/March 2008 by Peter Horne in our... Read more

Posted in Algae, Plants | By

Oct 29

October 29, 2019

The Loss and Recovery of the Anchors from Matthew Flinders’ Ship HMS Investigator

The Loss and Recovery of the Anchors from Matthew Flinders’ Ship HMS Investigator by Steve Reynolds The large anchor inside the South Australian Maritime Museum is from Matthew Flinders’ ship HMS Investigator. It is a 4m-long, 1 tonne stocked anchor and it is possibly the oldest known anchor in South Australia. It has a (replica) large wooden stock. It was... Read more

Posted in Maritime History, Shipwrecks | By

Oct 28

October 28, 2019

A Study of Melanism in the Black Manta Rays of the Indo-Pacific

A Study of Melanism in the Black Manta Rays of the Indo-Pacific by Steve Reynolds Melanism is “darkening of body tissues caused by excessive production of melanin, especially as a form of colour variation in animals”. I know that black manta rays in the Indo-Pacific does not relate to South Australian marine life at all, but I read a report... Read more

Posted in Bony fishes, Sharks & Rays | By

Oct 14

October 14, 2019

Return to Christies Reef

Return to Christies Reef by Steve Reynolds A small group of us visited Christies Reef on 11th October 2019. It was a return visit for myself, following up on my visit there earlier in the year. The three of us got to dive independently (unintentionally). My own dive time underwater was a miserable 45 minutes, but I had enjoyed exploring... Read more

Posted in Coastal species, Dive Reports, Species lists | By

Oct 13

October 13, 2019

A Little More About the Trafalgar and the Alert

A Little More About the Trafalgar and the Alert by Steve Reynolds Further to the details provided in Changes Over Time to Two Wreck Sites at the Jervois Basin Ships’ Graveyard, the 1877-built paddle steamer Trafalgar may have been beached in the Jervois Basin in the 1940s, The paddle steamer Trafalgar at Echuca This picture is taken from “Redgum &... Read more

Posted in Maritime History | By

Sep 26

September 26, 2019

David Witton anchor anniversary

David Witton anchor anniversary by Steve Reynolds Continuing my recent focus on Witton Bluff, as I wrote in our May 1985 newsletter, it “is situated at the southern end of Christies Beach, just before the northern end of the Port Noarlunga reef. There is a reef at Witton Bluff which extends out to sea from the mainland. It is fully... Read more

Posted in Maritime History | By

Sep 26

September 26, 2019

Species sighted at Witton Bluff & Christies Reef

Species sighted at Witton Bluff & Christies Reef by Steve Reynolds As reported in My Early Diving Days , Witton Bluff is the high point on the coast between Port Noarlunga and Christies Beach. It is named after the 1839 wreck of the David Witton. I did my first sea snorkel there in January 1978. I returned there later that year with... Read more

Posted in Algae, Bony fishes, Citizen Science, Coastal species, Dive Reports, intertidal zone, Marine invertebrates, Nudibranchs, Plants, sea urchins, Sharks & Rays, Species lists | By

Sep 23

September 23, 2019

My Early Diving Days

My Early Diving Days by Steve Reynolds Witton Bluff is the high point on the coast between Port Noarlunga and Christies Beach. It is named after the 1839 wreck of the David Witton. I did my ‘first’ sea snorkel there in January 1978. I say ‘first’ because I had briefly used one of those ‘ping pong’ mask and snorkels as... Read more

Posted in Dive Reports | By