A Little More About the Trafalgar and the Alert

October 13, 2019 | Posted in: Maritime History

A Little More About the Trafalgar and the Alert

by Steve Reynolds

Further to the details provided in Changes Over Time to Two Wreck Sites at the Jervois Basin Ships’ Graveyard, the 1877-built paddle steamer Trafalgar may have been beached in the Jervois Basin in the 1940s,

The paddle steamer Trafalgar at Echuca

This picture is taken from “Redgum & Paddlewheels – Australia’s inland river trade” by Peter J. Phillips. According to the book, the Trafalgar carried both cargo and passengers and she once produced one of the fastest journeys in river history.

The vessel was brought to Port Adelaide by Reginald Crouch in the 1940s to be converted to a ketch, but the ship’s weak iron frame prevented that, so he left it beached.

The partially submerged Trafalgar in 2011

This picture is taken from “Redgum & Paddlewheels – Australia’s inland river trade” by Peter J. Phillips. According to the book, the Trafalgar carried both cargo and passengers and she once produced one of the fastest journeys in river history.

The 1872-built ketch Alert was broken up and beached in 1960. It had been built by J&D McKay in 1872, registered by J. Evans and J. McLeod in Port Adelaide in 1873.

The Alert  in 2019

There are many (lots) of photos of the Trafalgar in “Redgum & Paddlewheels – Australia’s inland river trade” by Peter J. Phillips.

The Trafalgar in 2019

Several photos of the Trafalgar wreck in July 2019 can be found at https://photos.google.com/photo/AF1QipONojCQ5d8RTd19-6jnzN-k_imOeyMQtF5x2nDM.

Steve Reynolds is the current President of MLSSA and is a long-standing member of the Society. Steve is a keen diver, underwater explorer, photographer and is chief author of the Society's extensive back catalogue of newsletters and journals.

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