Viewing: June, 2017

Jun 26

June 26, 2017

Bolinopsis, Port Bonython 2017 - Dan Monceaux

The comb jellies Bolinopsis and Mnemiopsis

I took this ‘one off’ shot of a clear jelly during my dive at Moonta Bay jetty in June 2017. While the photograph is enigmatic, my observations were sufficient for me to pursue a positive identification of the species. It turned out to be a comb jelly, and my interest in the animal was piqued and extended with help from... Read more

Posted in Cnidaria, Invasive species, Jetties, Marine invertebrates | By

Jun 25

June 25, 2017

Our stay at the Moonta Bay Beach Villas

A small group of Society members were able to stay at the Moonta Bay Beach Villas over the weekend recently, thanks to the kindness of Peter Anastassiadis. We were supposed to be a bigger group, but half of the group cancelled out at the last minute due to cold or flu problems. Lyndon and David arrived at the villa on... Read more

Posted in Dive Reports, Jetties | By

Jun 19

June 19, 2017

Osedax Worms Update 2

Osedax worms have been found in Australian waters for the first time. Osedax worms are ‘whale’ worms, worms that feed on the bones of dead whales. They were recently found burrowed deep inside the bones of a pilot whale hauled up from a deep-sea abyss off Byron Bay, New South Wales (no pun intended). The skull and spine of the... Read more

Posted in Research, Whales & Dolphins, Worms | By

Jun 13

June 13, 2017

Congolli, Pseudaphritis urvillii

This fish that I photographed at the Ships’ Graveyard in the North Arm of the Port River earlier this year was confirmed on iNaturalist as being a Congolli (Pseudaphritis urvillii). I had reported the sighting of the Congolli in my article titled “Further Discoveries at the Ships Graveyard” at http://mlssa.org.au/2017/03/25/further-discoveries-at-the-ships-graveyard/ I came across another one in Angas Inlet at the... Read more

Posted in Bony fishes | By

Jun 12

June 12, 2017

Shovelnose Stingarees

Fish identification can be tricky at the best of times. Then there are often new species that were not included in the old fish books. And the scientific names of species are often changing, and even changing back again. I recently revisited my 2016 article titled “Same Ray Seen Two Months Apart” (It can be found at http://mlssa.org.au/2016/01/09/same-ray-seen-two-months-apart/). It was... Read more

Posted in Sharks & Rays | By