Maritime Archaeology and the ‘Big Anchor Project’

by Steve Reynolds

 

On 19th May 2013, I attended the South Australian Archaeology Society (SAAS) ‘Big Anchor Project’ day at the Birkenhead Tavern, Port Adelaide. SAAS volunteers ran workshops detailing the process of recording an anchor. Although I could only participate for a short while, I learned a great deal about the finer points (no pun intended) of anchors.

I was provided with a flyer about the SAAS, a booklet about SA’s 2013 History Festival, Recording Guidance Notes and a Recording Form. As luck would have it, I had taken along my own clipboard, pen, tape measures and camera. The only other pieces of equipment that I needed the use of were a GPS, scale stick and compass, but these were all provided by the SAAS.

I didn’t have time to read the Recording Guidance Notes, but the volunteer assisting me helped me to learn the terminology used for anchors and how to measure and record the details on a Recording Form. She also taught me how to take suitable photos of my subject anchor. My subject anchor was the large “Iron Stocked Anchor” out the front of the Birkenhead Tavern.

The large “Iron Stocked Anchor” out the front of the Birkenhead Tavern

(Taken by Steve Reynolds)

 

By the time that I was expected to pencil-draw the anchor, I said that I was due somewhere else, and quickly retreated. But I had really enjoyed the experience and knowledge gained.

One of the two ‘flukes’ on the anchor

(Taken by Steve Reynolds)

 

Here is the large anchor to be found at the start of Semaphore jetty: –

Large anchor at the start of Semaphore jetty

(Taken by Steve Reynolds)

 

Now I just want to get back to this anchor underwater at Semaphore jetty: –

Anchor underwater at Semaphore jetty

(Taken by Steve Reynolds)

 

I found it whilst snorkeling there one day. Here it is from another angle: –

Anchor underwater at Semaphore jetty

(Taken by Steve Reynolds)

 

Here is the anchor from the John Pirie, located at Port Pirie: –

Anchor from the John Pirie

(Taken by Steve Reynolds)

 

Here is the large anchor from the Lady Kinnaird, located at Port Neill: –

Anchor from the Lady Kinnaird

(Taken by Steve Reynolds)

 

The ‘Big Anchor Project’ website can be found at www.biganchorproject.com/ .

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